Eastlit 2016 Popular Asiatic Literature

Eastlit 2016 Popular Asiatic Literature

2016 Popular Asiatic Literature: Old Bicycle in Udon by Graham LawrenceA very Happy New Year to all Eastlit’s readers, contributors and our team. Following what is becoming a tradition, here is the 2016 top thirty. This is now the fourth look at what is popular for a year. It is also the second time we have included the work from the Southlit Supplement that goes with every issue of Eastlit.

This year we see a mix of poetry, fiction, non-fiction and artwork and an in the 2016 popular Asiatic literature list.

If you want to see the previous years entries follow the links: 2014 Top Literature and 2013 Top Twenty, and the Eastlit 2015 Popular Asian Literature. And with no more ado, here are most read pieces of this year.

2016 Popular Asiatic Literature:

  1. A Veil of Silk by Jared Angel.
  2. Why I Write by Qui-Phiet Tran.
  3. Eastern Poetry by Graham Lawrence.
  4. Going Back to Emerald Hill by Chew Yi Wei.
  5. 377 by Manoj Nair.
  6. The Puppet Tree Illustration by Vasan Sitthiket.
  7. Ishinomaki by Cesar Polvorosa Jr.
  8. The Inherited Journey by Shehzad Ghias Shaikh.
  9. Family Drama by Juanita Kakoty.
  10. Stefan by Manoj Nair.
  11. Gwi’Shin by Todd Sullivan.
  12. Smoke and Mirrors by Sayantan Ghosh.
  13. Photograph by Ages Chew.
  14. Dead Drunk in Vientiane & Other Poems by Karlo Sevilla.
  15. Still Life and Two Other Poems by Anna Yin.
  16. Lelia by Adonis Zambrano Hornoz.
  17. The Puppet Tree by Andrew J. West.
  18. Conversations in the Sky by Preh Memon.
  19. Jong Il, from Yang Pyeong by Eric Stinton.
  20. White Lady by Tina Isaacs.
  21. Foreigners Spell Sex & Other Poems by Louie Crew Clay.
  22. Apples Are Grown in Aomori by Ian Rogers.
  23. Memory Lane by Sumayyah Malik.
  24. Bluebird Island by Pauline Lacanilao.
  25. A Block Party in Burma by Dorothy Hom.
  26. His Northern Hemisphere and Other Poems by Alton Melvar M Dapanas.
  27. Happy Encounter in a Rainy Christmas Night by Minglu Zeng.
  28. Dreams of Old Shanghai by Colin W. Campbell.
  29. Ate Keng & Other Poems by Erwin Ponce.
  30. Requiem by Theophilus Kwek.

Top 20 Countries where Eastlit was Read in 2016 (in alphabetical order)

  • Australia
  • Bangladesh
  • Canada
  • China and Hong Kong
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Nepal
  • Pakistan
  • Philippines
  • Russia
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • Sri Lanka
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • UK
  • USA
  • Vietnam

Statistics

Year on Year Readership Change 2014 to 2015

  • +22% January 2016 on January 2015.
  • +12% February 2016 on February 2015.
  • +5% March 2016 on March 2015.
  • +26% April 2016 on April 2015.
  • +20% May 2016 on May 2015.
  • +25% June 2016 on June 2015.
  • +43% July 2016 on July 2015.
  • +3% August 2016 on August 2015.
  • +89% September 2016 on September 2015.
  • +15% October 2016 on October 2015.
  • +45% November 2016 on November 2015.
  • +15% December 2016 on December 2015.

Year by Year Readership Change

  • +770% from year 2012 to 2013 (only 1 issue in 2012)
  • +52% from year 2013 to 2014
  • +10% from year 2014 to 2015 (only 10 issues is 2015)
  • +23% from year 2015 to 2016

Other News

The all time top thirty will be released later in a separate post. This may be in February. We continue to look at offering some writers the chance to have their work exposed in the ESL environment. I mentioned this an earlier news post on developments in literature in Eastlit. This would of course get your writing read by huge numbers. You name would also be far better known. ESL websites are far more read than any literary ones.

Thank you for your amazing support through 2016. We at Eastlit hopes you will continue to enjoy the journal in 2017. Once again I will introduce one or two new things in 2017. We like to develop as the years go by. But the main aim is to keep Eastlit vibrant and relevant to you as readers and writers. And to make sure that Eastlit plays it part as the poets, writers and artists of Asia take their place alongside those from more traditional literary regions.

And if you want to support Eastlit’s aims you can like, share or even donate – link below (for credit card donation click continue at the bottom):




 

Lastly

If anyone has any comments or suggestions on anything to do with Eastlit please get in touch with the editor. All feedback is listened to, considered and appreciated! We are also looking for guest editorials and a possible volunteer for the editorial board. If anyone wants to be interviewed for Eastlit, let me know. Oh and if you like us, linking to our site is always appreciated!

Have a great 2017.

Cheers.

Graham.

Eastlit Support for 2016 to 2017

Donations to Help Eastlit (note: eastlit1 at g mail for PayPal donations)

Eastlit Support. One Dollar. Please helpIt is that time ot the year again where we start to try and raise a little money for Eastlit support to cover costs and other things. From 2016 to 2017 we would like to use some of the money raised on a few modest adverts through social media and literary circles. This will help to get more readers for the fiction, poetry, artwork and other creative writing focused on East, Southeast and South Asia. Even though we are currently seeing growth in readership of 30% on last year, more can be done. All in all I think it is best to do what we can without introducing advertising to cover it.

All donations of even a few dollars help and on social media some advertising campaigns can be run a a fairly small budget. Eastlit as our long term readers know is advertisement free at the request of contributors and readers. We genuinely hope to continue with this policy. However, there are bills to pay and every little helps. The donation link is below this paragraph and has been activated on many pages. If you prefer to make a financial, prize or gift donation in a different way, please contact Graham. If you have any questions about how you can help Eastlit or what we use donations for, please contact us through the Eastlit contact page.




As you may be aware our editorial board and advisory team are all voluntary. My time is also provided free and the only income to help support Eastlit comes from this annual call.

Of course the Eastlit the team will do its best to continue bringing you what we think is interesting Asian focused English literature and artwork. We will also continue to try and support new and emerging poets and writers especially those within our region, and keep Eastlit to its monthly schedule however demanding this becomes.

Eastlit Support in Other Ways

If you cannot help with a donation, spreading the word about Eastlit, or this request helps. If you have any other idea’s I would love to hear too.

Cheers.

Graham

Eastlit Literature News 2016

Literature News 2016 by Eastlit: Eastlit March 2016.There is quite a lot in this Eastlit Literature News 2016 post! In the coming year, I have a number of plans to move Eastlit forward. These involve offering our contributors wider audiences and our readers a greater variety. Part of this will be to share our Asian writers work in other regions of the world that Eastlit does not currently have a high profile in. We will be looking for partners to help both us and them to offer new audiences.

A new services page will also be added. The aim of this will be to offer support and background services to writers and poets who need a little help. We want to help you get your work published. We want to help you feel confident that your work is great. These services will be offered by a small group of native speaker/writers based in developing countries. That means the prices will be a lot more affordable for many.

We also have a serialization coming up in the second half of the year and a small special issue celebrating the poetry of the African diaspora in Hong Kong.

All the details of this literature news 2016 are below.

Partnerships with Other Journals

Eastlit is looking for partnerships with other similar journals covering the following regions:

  • Africa
  • Middle-East
  • Latin America
  • Central Asia
  • Eastern Europe

The plan is to work as partners to announce each issue of each others journals. But more than this, the idea is that every year we will each run one or two special issues highlighting the work of selected poets and writers from each of our diasporas. This will hopefully help build far bigger audiences for each of our local writers.

I am looking to partner with online journals of a similar nature to Eastlit. That means:

  • Not affiliated to any organization, company or institution.
  • Established for at least a year with at least 4 issues published.
  • With some form of editorial board.
  • But mostly with a desire to see the literatrue of your locality get the readership it deserves.

Journal owners etc please contact Graham if interested or use the Eastlit contact page.

Services

I will soon be adding a special page for these. However, they are all ready to run now. So if you want to get in early drop me a line. The services that will be offered are:

  • Writing Mentor Service
  • Editing
  • Proofreading
  • Publishing and Printing Service covering India and the sub-Continent:
    • If you are interested in publication, marketing and distribution service in this locale, let me know.
  • Creative Writing classes.
  • Developing Creativity classes.

All of the above are at special rates more suited to Asia than the West. For example, many are about 30% of what you would pay in a western country, but still done by a native speaker/writer.

Eastlit Literature News 2016: Eastlit Extras

As mentioned above, in the next couple of months a special slim poetry of the African diaspora in Hong Kong will be published byEastlit. We are also interested in publishing other special issues to highlight particular groups. Years ago we had the chance to publish literature from a Burmese refugee camp until demands for corruption money descended. It would be nice to get back to this kind of opportunity.

In the second half of the year, we will serialize a collection of shorts plus artwork by one of Eastlit’s old regular contributors.

Other Literature News 2016

Remember if you want e-mail notifications of when the next issue Eastlit is out, you can sign up for our Eastlit Newsletter. We only use this to inform people of an issue coming out, or a news post like this coming out. You will not be inundated with rubbish. There are also our usual social media links.

Eastlit readership is currently up 18% on last year. It is also at all time record levels. I am predicting growth of 30% for the year based on acceleration of readership and that last year we only published 10 issues. We will see, but it will definitely be a good year for our contributors in getting their work read!

I got this piece of news from Kristine Ong Muslim whose piece Dark Clocks was published by Eastlit in January 2015:

My short story collection Age of Blight (Unnamed Press, 2016) has just been released.

My book A Room Full of Machines (ELJ Publications, 2015) contained the poem “Dark Clocks,” which appeared in the January 2015 issue of Eastlit.

Lifeboat (University of Santo Tomas Publishing House, 2015) is another poetry collection.

Ok well that is all the development and literature news 2016. I hope 2016 is going well for everyone and you continue to enjoy Eastlit.

Cheers

Graham

 

 

Eastlit 2015 Popular Asian Literature

Eastlit 2015 Popular Asian Literature.

2015 Popular Asian Literature. Eastlit: JoHo by Graham Lawrence

Happy New Year to all our readers and contributors. Following tradition, here is the 2015 top thirty. This is the third look at what is popular for a year. The start of Southlit Supplement has added a new region. So I have increased the usual top 20 to a top 30 this year.

This year we see a mix of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, artwork and an interview in the 2015 popular Asian literature list.

If you want to see the previous years entries follow the links: 2014 Top Literature and 2013 Top Twenty. But with no more ado, here are this years.

2015 Popular Asian Literature:

  1. A Veil of Silk by Jared Angel.
  2. Ishinomaki by Cesar Polvorosa Jr.
  3. Eastern Poetry by Graham Lawrence.
  4. Translucence & The Exile by James Underwood
  5. Going Back to Emerald Hill by Chew Yi Wei.
  6. The Writing is on the White Board by Connla Stokes
  7. Boxing Day ’13 by Hồn Du Mục
  8. The Puppet Tree Illustration by Vasan Sitthiket.
  9. Why I Write by Qui-Phiet Tran.
  10. A Descendant of Emperor Shang Tang by Minglu Zeng
  11. At the Frozen Lakeshore and China by Minglu Zeng
  12. Smoke and Mirrors by Sayantan Ghosh.
  13. Poem by Preeyakit Buranasin.
  14. Ashwin Mudigonda Interview by Graham Lawrence
  15. The Puppet Tree by Andrew J. West.
  16. 21 Rupees and 25 Paisa by Vidya Panicker
  17. The Man Root by L.P. Lee
  18. Love Story for a Foreign Girl by Fiona Cheong
  19. Still Life and Two Other Poems by Anna Yin
  20. Return to Gander by Xiaowen Zeng
  21. Ma’s Mosquito Moment by Hong-My Basrai
  22. Fifth Daughter of Tung by Paula Tan
  23. Bluebird Island by Pauline Lacanilao
  24. Junko & Other Poems by Yumiko Tsumura
  25. Morning Music by Jonathan Ng
  26. Hibakusha by L.P. Lee
  27. Violin Girl by T-net Quiring
  28. High Water & Other Poems by Reid Mitchell
  29. Family Drama by Juanita Kakoty
  30. Reliving World War II in the Philippines by Carol Colborn

Top 20 Countries where Eastlit was Read in 2015 (in alphabetical order)

  • Australia
  • Bangladesh
  • Canada
  • China and Hong Kong
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Myanmar
  • Nepal
  • Pakistan
  • Philippines
  • Russia
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • UK
  • USA
  • Vietnam

Statistics

Year on Year Readership Change 2014 to 2015

  • +32% January 2015 on January 2014.
  • +11% February 2015 on February 2014.
  • +9% March 2015 on March 2014.
  • +10% April 2015 on April 2014.
  • +8% May 2015 on May 2104.
  • 0% June 2015 on June 2014.
  • +1% July 2015 on July 2014.
  • +21% August 2015 on August 2014.
  • +1% September 2015 on September 2014. (No issue)
  • +26% October 2015 on October 2014.
  • +2% November 2015 on November 2014. (No issue)
  • +14% December 2015 on December 2014

Year by Year Readership Change

  • +770% from year 2012 to 2013 (only 1 issue in 2012)
  • +52% from year 2013 to 2014
  • +10% from year 2014 to 2015 (only 10 issues is 2015)

Other News

Thank you for your brilliant support over 2015. The whole team at Eastlit hopes you will continue to enjoy the journal in 2016. I will again introduce one or two new things in 2016. We like to develop as the years go by. But the main aim is to keep Eastlit vibrant and relevant to you as readers and writers.

If anyone has any comments or suggestions on anything to do with Eastlit please get in touch with the editor. All feedback is listened to, considered and appreciated! We are also looking for guest editorials and a possible volunteer for the editorial board. If anyone wants to be interviewed for Eastlit, let me know. Oh and if you like us, linking to our site is always appreciated!

Have a great 2016.

Cheers.

Graham.

Eastlit November News

Eastlit November News includes the latest addition to Eastlit Live. There is also a round up of latest publications by Eastlit published writers and some mention of other good causes. Finally there is a quick round up of general news in this Eastlit November news post.

Eastlit Live

The latest addition to Eastlit live is Pangolin by Usha Kishore. It includes and introduction followed by a reading of Pangolin by poet Usha Kishore. Pangolin was first published in Eastlit May 2015 with a collection of poems.

In Empty Places

In Empty Places is a collection of short stories and artwork. It raises money and awareness for the Bantuan Coffee Foundation. They help victims of child prostitution in Indonesia.

Eastlit November News: In Empty Places. In Empty Places was published last year. Now there are only a few copies remaining. So it is last chance to get one. Follow the link in the picture for more information.

Sanjeev Sethi

Eastlit November News: This Summer and That Summer by Sanjeev SethiSanjeev Sethi’s third volume of Poetry, This Summer and That Summer has recently been released. You can read all about it by clicking on the link in the cover picture.

You can also read one of the new poems there.

If you would like to read more of Sanjeev’s poems from Eastlit, Sanjeev has had the following poetry published in Eastlit:

Sanjeev has also recently been working on our editorial board.

Tom Sheehan

Eastlit November News: A Collection of Friends by Tom SheehanMultiple published author Tom Sheehan, who has featured in Eastlit several times, has a new book out. This one, A Collection of Friends, pays tribute to the people who have flowed through Tom’s life.

You can read more about Tom on his Amazon page by clicking on the picture.

Apart from his published books, Tom has hundreds of pieces of work poublished on the internet. He also has quite a collection that have been published on Eastlit over the past three years.

Some of Tom’s previous pieces in Eastlit are:

Tse Hao Guang

Eastlit November News: Deeds of Light by Tse Hao GuangSingaporean writer Tse Hao Guang has recently had his collection of poetry, Deeds of Light published by Math Paper Press.

You can get more information by clicking on the link in the picture.

Tse Hao Guang has had work previously published in Eastlit.

This includes:

  • Midautumn which was featured in Eastlit Novenber 2013.

Eastlit November News

Eastlit December 2015 will be out in early December. This will be the last of the recent bimonthly issues. From January Eastlit will revert back to a monthly publication.

I am looking to add possibly one more person to the editorial board. I would like someone focused on East or Southeast Asia this time. If you are interested contact Eastlit admin.

And finally, thanks to all our readers out there.

Cheers

Graham

Recently Published Literature & Other News

News

Well thanks to those of you who have been following these news segments over the 3 years of Eastlit. The good news is that Eastlit will be continuing into its fourth year and heading back to a monthly publication. Apart from that I do have a poetry reading to add to Eastlit Live. This will go up in the next few months. If anyone else has any multimedia stuff they would like us to add, please let me know. You can go through the submissions link.

Anyway enough of me rambling on. Below is some information on some recently published literature by writers previously featured by Eastlit, and a few statistics for those interested in such things.

Recently Published Literature

I have recently noticed that some writers previously published in Eastlit have been doing well elsewhere. Below is a rundown on their recently published literature and some links to their Eastlit work. It will be great if you can support these writers by spreading the word, taking a look and/or purchasing copies as is appropriate. For the record I neither want nor recieve anything for this, and decide what works to mention!

Yumiko Tsumura

Eastlit: Poetry Kanto 2015. Yumiko TsumuraPoetry Kanto 2015 front page features 5 short poetry translations by Yumiko Tsumura. The translations are of poetry by acclaimed Japanese poet Kazuko Shiraishi. Yumiko is a hard working writer who not only works on translation, but also pens her own work.

Yumiko Tsumura has had the following work published in Eastlit:

Iain Maloney

Eastlit: Recently Published Literature: Silma Hill. Iain MaloneyAmazon has big discounts on Iain Maloney’s two novels, Silma Hill and First Time Solo. There are synopses of both at the Amazon link. Iain is a Japan based writer. He is also on the Eastlit editorial board. Apart from that he is a decent guy who keeps control of his own creative ideas by using indie publishers. So why not take a look and give him some support?

Iain has been with us and actively involved at Eastlit almost from the start, first as a writer and later as a member of the editorial board.

Iain Maloney has had the following work published by Eastlit:

Statistics

Year on Year Readership Change

  • + 46% December 2013 on December 2012.
  • +172% January 2014 on January 2013.
  • +161% February 2104 on February 2013.
  • +242% March 2014 on March 2013.
  • +64% April 2014 on April 2013.
  • +8% May 2014 on May 2013.
  • +69% June 2014 on June 2013.
  • +17% July 2014 on July 2013.
  • +33% August 2014 on August 2013.
  • +21% September 2014 on September 2013.
  • +2% October 2014 on October 2013.
  • +32% November 2014 on November 2013.
  • +26% December 2014 on December 2013.
  • +32% January 2015 on January 2014.
  • +11% February 2015 on February 2014.
  • +9% March 2015 on March 2014.
  • +10% April 2015 on April 2014.
  • +8% May 2015 on May 2104.
  • 0% June 2015 on June 2014.
  • +1% July 2015 on July 2014.
  • +21% August 2015 on August 2014.
  • +1% September 2015 on September 2014.
  • +26% October 2015 on October 2014.

Top Ten Countries in Alphabetical Order:

  • China & Hong Kong.
  • India.
  • Japan.
  • Malaysia.
  • Philippines.
  • Singapore.
  • Thailand.
  • United Kingdom.
  • United States.
  • Vietnam.

Cheers

Graham

Georgia

Some people ask why we publish literature in Georgia (font). Well the story goes like this:
Georgia: Eastlit FontWhen I set up Eastlit I spent quite a bit of time thinking about fonts and recognizing that while I had no clue about fonts, it would be important and should be both readable and identifiable. So I talked to a font designer who basically decried Times New Roman, praised the new at the time Google fonts and mentioned that Georgia was one of the few fonts that retained some quirkiness. I then read through the entire debate about should text be in sans serif or serif and at the time there was a leaning to forgetting conventional wisdom and going for sans serif. Then it was off to look at Google fonts. Oh so many of them and they looked as modern and boring as the new Google logo, plus for some reason they seemed to have occasional loading issues. Totally confused and procrastinating for ages, I finally found an obscure article that mentioned when reading e-books if people could select the font, the most commonly chosen font (around 35%) was Georgia. Well working on the people ain’t wrong, Georgia it was.

Graham

Note: Helvetica Neua is the font used on our Eastlit pages and announcements. Georgia is only used for published work.

Help Eastlit

Help Eastlit: MoneyOnce a year at Eastlit we make a call for donations. In 2015 we face a larger bill than normal. If anyone can help Eastlit by making a small donation of a few dollars, it would help a lot. Eastlit as our long term readers know is advertisement free at the request of contributors and readers. We genuinely hope to continue with this policy. However, there are bills to pay and every little helps. The donation link is below this paragraph. If you have any questions about how you can help Eastlit or what we use donations for, please contact us through the Eastlit contact page.




For those not aware, our editorial board and Eastlit team all work on a voluntary basis to keep cost low.

At Eastlit the team will do its best to continue bringing you what we think is interesting Asian focused English literature. We will also continue to try and support new and emerging poets and writers especially those within our region.

Other ways to Help Eastlit

If you cannot help with a donation, spreading the word about Eastlit, or this request is good, or just like our page etc.

Cheers.

Graham

Popular Asian literature and Eastlit News

Announcement

These monthly lists will become less regular. They may be quarterly. The January yearly list will also be continued. It seems to be time to concentrate on other areas of news and development in what is limited time each month. So having said that, here is another list.

Popular Asian Literature

Popular Asian Literature. Eastlit June 2015 Cover. Picture: Shizi Gou #17 by Wen Zhang. Cover design by Graham Lawrence. Copyright photographer, Eastlit and Graham Lawrence.Here are the updated lists of popular Asian literature found in Eastlit. These Eastlit lists pf popular Asian literature includes all the popular work including fiction, poetry, artwork and non-fiction of the most recent seven and thirty days. I have also updated the all time list of popular Asian literature. Links to each piece are included.

You can access these pieces of popular Asian literature form the links on this page or the links in the navigation bar or through our archive. Hopefully, you will also spend a little time reading some of the other material. We all know the most popualr is not always the best and what people like is very subjective.

Please note that we have a policy of excluding all the covers, content pages, contributor lists etc from these statistics.

Popular Asian Literature Last Seven Day:

  1. A Veil of Silk by Jared Angel (June 2014).
  2. Poem by Preeyakit Buranasin (October 2014).
  3. Why I Write by Qui-Phiet Tran (April 2014).
  4. Gold Moments by Colin W. Campbell (May 2015).
  5. The Boy of Mt. Puh by Minglu Zheng (April 2015).

Popular Asian Literature Last Thirty Days:

  1. Zara AdcockAn Eastlit Interview by Graham Lawrence (June 2015).
  2. A Knock on the Door by Rahad Abir (June 2015).
  3. Bitter Potion & Other Poems by Mai Văn Phấn (June 2014).
  4. Uneven Path & Other Poems by Gopal Lahiri (May 2015).
  5. Saving Princess Pingyang by Sze-Leng Tan (June 2015).

Popular Asian Literature All Time:

  1. Ishinomaki by Cesar Polvorosa Jr. (February 2014).
  2. The Foreign Man Is Prepared to Take Everything in His Stride by Connla Stokes (July 2014).
  3. Smoke and Mirrors by Sayantan Ghosh (April 2014).
  4. Going Back to Emerald Hill by Chew Yi Wei (April 2013).
  5. A Veil of Silk by Jared Angel (June 2014).
  6. The Bicentennial by Cesar Polvorosa Jr. (June 2014).
  7. A Descendant of Emperor Shang Tang by Minglu Zeng (December 2014).
  8. The Puppet Tree by Andrew J. West (October 2013).
  9. Bluebird Island by Pauline Lacanilao (December 2013).
  10. One Day Friends by Ralph Catedral (February 2014).

Year on Year Readership Change

  • + 46% December 2013 on December 2012.
  • +172% January 2014 on January 2013.
  • +161% February 2104 on February 2013.
  • +242% March 2014 on March 2013.
  • +64% April 2014 on April 2013.
  • +8% May 2014 on May 2013.
  • +69% June 2014 on June 2013.
  • +17% July 2014 on July 2013.
  • +33% August 2014 on August 2013.
  • +21% September 2014 on September 2013.
  • +2% October 2014 on October 2013.
  • +32% November 2014 on November 2013.
  • +26% December 2014 on December 2013.
  • +32% January 2015 on January 2014.
  • +11% February 2015 on February 2014.
  • +9% March 2015 on March 2014.
  • +10% April 2015 on April 2014.
  • +8% May 2015 on May 2104.

Top Ten Countries in Alphabetical Order:

  • China & Hong Kong.
  • India.
  • Japan.
  • Malaysia.
  • Philippines.
  • Singapore.
  • Thailand.
  • United Kingdom.
  • United States.
  • Vietnam.

Other Eastlit News

The next issue of Eastlit will probably be out around the end of June or start of July. Due to family commitments, I have a lot less free time this month.

Cheers and Enjoy.

Graham

Eastlit News May 2015

It is a long while since, I have done an Eastlit news post, and there are a number of developments to mention. So here is the first Eastlit news post in a while.

Easlit Live

We should soon have a new poetry reading up on Eastlit Live. When we do, I will mention it in the news again. At the moment I am just waiting for some artwork to add to it. When I launched Eastlit Live I thought it would be an exciting development, so this is great news for me.

If you have any multimedia poetry or story readings or other multimedia art pieces that you would like us to consider for Eastlit Live, please contact GrahamAnything we put on Eastlit Live will also be mentioned in a news item here, to make sure our community are aware.

Graham Interviewed

Eastlit News May 2015: Asian Books BlogRosie Milne of the Asian Books Blog took the time to interview me about Eastlit and publishing. If you are interested in my views, why not take a read of All About Eastlit / Graham Lawrence

The Asian Books Blog which has been going for a few years now, has a lot of other stuff worth a read too. If you have a few minutes to spare, take a look around and see what Rosie is up to at the Asian Books Blog.

Eastlit E-Magazine, Print and More

I still want to see Eastlit published in an e-magazine/e-book version that can be read on Android, iOS and Kindle devices. As soon as I can find the time, I plan to make this happen.

You will notice that there is now a print button on most pages, if you prefer to read your favorites on paper!. I added this a few months back. The page can also be turned into a PDF via this button.

Southlit Supplement

A few months ago, I integrated the separate Southlit Journal into Eastlit as a Supplement. This was done as there seemed an obvious connection in culture at least between South and Southeast Asia. There was also an overlap in readership. When I added on all the extra work it involved for me and the team, combining the two made sense.

For readers this also adds a wider variety of poetry, fiction and artwork to read and view each month. If you are primarily interested in South Asia, you can go straight to the supplement. If you are interested in East and Southeast Asia, stick with our usual magazine. However, I do hope that a bit of variety adds something for our readership.

For contributors it adds an opportunity for you work to be more widely seen and be seen in a different region or two.

Finally in Eastlit News

Thanks to the recently expanded editorial board for all your hard work. I am especially thankful to the original poetry reading group for coping without complaint with all the extra poetry that had to be read each month before the board was expanded.

Enough on Eastlit news for now.

Cheers.

Graham