Moonlight Scarf and Two Other Poems

by Rose Lu

Moonlight Scarf

Lying in softness
To gaze the stars with my eyes closed
But I see you standing in the icy snow.
 
I knit a Scarf
With moonlight
And let the frosty wind send it to you
 
No
I let it take me over
For I want to put
This warm Scarf on you
With my own hands
 
To see with my own eyes
How your face
Turn into a smiling happy sun.

 

That Door

The door which I’ve been craving for, 
Desperately, for its being opened for me 
 
Out of day in the night 
I’ve been longing for half of my lifetime 
and finally I find it open 
 
However, lacking the guts to go forward 
I can only silently crave 
With tear-filled eyes 
 
The door is 
Closed again 
Locking the pains I never dare to touch 
inside 
 
That door 
Is the center of my whole life 
And what I’ve being searched for three lives 
 
Will the door I’ve been craving for 
Open for me once more 
and let me exchange with the remainder of my life 
for an advance in the real sense 

 

Flourish and Fade

Every floral flourishing 
Is a hope of dream 
Every brilliant blow 
Is a risk of life 
 
When a flower blooms, 
I don’t know if it will bear fruit 
But when it flourishes 
I know it’ll inevitably fade 
 
They say women are like flowers 
And maidens the freshest 
There isn’t a single flower that never fades 
Nor a maiden who can stay forever in her prime 
 
Both natural flourishing and unhurried fading 
Are romances 
 
A frosty-headed fair lady 
gazes at the withering petals in the tree 
As a gust of wind blows 
They fly away with the breeze 
 
The lady 
Smiles in the wind 
so brightly 
As brightly as a flourishing daisy 

 

Editor’s Note on Moonlight Scarf and Two Other Poems:

Before Moonlight Scarf, Rose Lu has had a variety of poems published in Eastlit:

  • Five poems published in the April 2013 issue of Eastlit.
  • Three poems published in the July 2013 issue of Eastlit.
  • Rose Lu Poetry: a collection of 4 poems published in the October 2013 issue of Eastlit.
  • Rose Lu Poems a group of 4 poems published in the March 2014 issue of Eastlit.
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